amritsar@davesar.com
 098143 15346

Customs & lifestyle - Australia/Canada/New Zealand/UK

Australia

Australian culture represents a combination of all the customs and traditions of the cultures across worldwide who had resided here. These were European and aboriginal culture legacy which had greatly inhibited the Australian culture and at present the current Australian culture represents that fusion only.

Australians

European settlers brought together many food and lifestyle traditions, and also the Australia nowadays is a mixture of these influences, in addition to current American influences. Australian holidays often are affected by this fusion. With many Australians living within 50 kilometers of the coast, they have a relaxed social lifestyle. An average weekend can include a swim or surf within the ocean, participation or attendance in a sporting match, a barbecue with friends and getting together with family. Australians often embrace their environment proudly, native or otherwise.

Life Style in Australia: Australians are very friendly and helpful people, with a great sense of humor and a natural ability to tell jokes and play with words. Some times we may appear cold because of our "private nature" which has been imported over the past 2 decades, but it is just takes time to "break the ice", and everything goes well. It means you can talk about any subject, but for more personal matters, things will take a little bit longer to come out in the open.

Preservation of the environment is ten out of ten for Australia. It is amazing; how much care conscientious Australians dedicate to preserving the environment. It doesn't only cover nature conservation such as mountains, rivers, forests and oceans, it spans into the cities as well. Australians love Australia and are very proud of having a clean and beautiful land. The majority of the population are very concerned about ecological and preservation matters, involving themselves as much as possible to keep it that way. Not only will normal people report damage to the environment, but the authorities will also give you heavy fines for dumping anything you are not allowed to. Streets and locations are very clean.

Canada

The name Canada is derived from the Iroquoian word kanata, which means village.

Linguistic Affiliation

Canada is bilingual, with English and French as the official languages. English takes precedence in statutory proceedings outside of Quebec, with English versions of all statutes serving as the final arbiter in disputes over interpretation.

Food in Daily Life

The agricultural and ethnic richness of Canada has led to two distinctive characteristics of everyday food consumption. The first is its scale. Canadians are "big eaters," with meat portions in particular dominating the Canadian meal. There are generally three regular meals in a given day. Breakfast, often large and important in rural areas, but less so in urban areas, is most often not eaten in a group. Lunch, at midday, is most often a snack in urban areas, but remains a substantial meal in rural centers. Dinner, the final formal meal of the day, is also the meal most likely to be eaten by a residential group as a whole, and it is the largest and the most socially important meal of the day. It is the meal most often used as a social event or to which invitations to nonfamily members are extended, in contrast with lunch which is often, for adults, shared with coworkers.

Political correctness

Many Canadians value political correctness, which means they avoid expressions or actions that could be insulting to others. Canadians believe themselves to be tolerant of different lifestyles and custom.

Climate

Canada is often associated with cold weather and snow, but in reality, its climate is as diverse as its landscape. Generally, Canadians enjoy four very distinct seasons, particularly in the more populated regions along the US border. Daytime summer temperatures can rise to 35°C and higher, while lows of -25°C are not uncommon in winter. More moderate temperatures are the norm in spring and fall.

Summers can be hot and dry on the prairies, humid in central Canada, and milder on the coasts. Spring is generally pleasant across the country. Autumns are often crisp and cool, but brightened by rich orange and red leaves on trees.

Winters are generally cold with periods of snow, although southern Alberta enjoys the occasional "Chinook", a warm dry wind from the Rocky Mountains that gusts through and melts the snow. Winters are mild and wet on the west coast, in cities such as Vancouver and Victoria.

When the temperature does drop, Canadians stay warm thanks to an infrastructure of heated houses, cars and public transportation systems. Some cities have also installed walkways to and from buildings in schools.

New Zealand

New Zealand English is close to Australian English in pronunciation, but has several differences often overlooked by people from outside these countries. The most obvious difference is in vowel pronunciation. The Australian i-sound is like the New Zealand e, and the New Zealand i like the Australian u. New Zealand vowels in general are softer in phonetic terms. Some of these differences show New Zealand English to have more affinity with the English of southern England than Australian English does.

New Zealand Climate & Weather

New Zealand weather and climate is of paramount importance to the people of New Zealand, as many New Zealander's make their living from the land. New Zealand has mild temperatures, moderately high rainfall, and many hours of sunshine throughout most of the country. New Zealand's climate is dominated by two main geographical features: the mountains and the sea.

New Zealand does not have a large temperature range, lacking the extremes found in most continental climates. However, New Zealand weather can change unexpectedly—as cold fronts or tropical cyclones quickly blow in. Because of this, you should be prepared for sudden changes in weather and temperature if you're going hiking or doing other outdoor activities.

Political correctness

Many Canadians value political correctness, which means they avoid expressions or actions that could be insulting to others. Canadians believe themselves to be tolerant of different lifestyles and custom.

Climate

Canada is often associated with cold weather and snow, but in reality, its climate is as diverse as its landscape. Generally, Canadians enjoy four very distinct seasons, particularly in the more populated regions along the US border. Daytime summer temperatures can rise to 35°C and higher, while lows of -25°C are not uncommon in winter. More moderate temperatures are the norm in spring and fall.

Summers can be hot and dry on the prairies, humid in central Canada, and milder on the coasts. Spring is generally pleasant across the country. Autumns are often crisp and cool, but brightened by rich orange and red leaves on trees.

Winters are generally cold with periods of snow, although southern Alberta enjoys the occasional "Chinook", a warm dry wind from the Rocky Mountains that gusts through and melts the snow. Winters are mild and wet on the west coast, in cities such as Vancouver and Victoria.

When the temperature does drop, Canadians stay warm thanks to an infrastructure of heated houses, cars and public transportation systems. Some cities have also installed walkways to and from buildings in schools.

United Kingdom

The cost of living varies from one part of the UK to another. Generally it is more expensive to live in London and the south-east of England, and cheaper up north.

Britain's currency is based on the pound sterling (£) which is divided into one hundred pence (100p).

The coin denominations are 1p, 2p, 5p, 10p, 20p, 50p, £1 and £2. The most common bank notes are £5, £10 and £20, though they do go higher.

Thousands of years ago, Great Britain was joined to Europe and was covered with ice. About 15,000 years ago, the weather became warmer. The ice melted and the sea level rose. Great Britain became an island about 8000 years ago.

Celtic people called Britons settles in Britain. They were warriors and farmers who were skilled metal workers. They built villages and hill forts, and used iron weapons and tools. Celts called Gaels lived in Ireland.

Education is an important part of British life. There are hundreds of schools, colleges and universities, including some of the most famous in the world.

Children's education in England is normally divided into two separate stages. They begin with primary education at the age of five and this usually lasts until they are eleven. Then they move to secondary school, there they stay until they reach sixteen, seventeen or eighteen years of age.

Teachers in primary schools ( 4 - 11 year old) are always addressed by their surname by parents and pupils alike, always Mr, Mrs or Miss Smith.…. In secondary schools (11 - 16 years), teachers are usually addressed as Miss or Sir.

People from all cultures and ethnicities can be found in every corner of Britain and each person in his or her own way has contributed to make Britain the place it is today.

If you walk down a street in Britain, especially in the bigger cities you will usually see people with different hair, skin and eye colours. They may have white, brown or black skin and blonde, brown, black, or red hair, with blue, black, brown or green eyes. Many of the people you will see will be British people but they all look different because the people of Britain are a mixed race. Roads and motorways are Britain's primary domestic transport routes. There are some 225,000 miles (362,000 km) of roads in Britain. Travel by car, van or taxi is by far the most common means of transport, accounting for 85 per cent of passenger mileage in Great Britain. There are two main kinds of buses in London: the red double-decker and the red single-decker. The main places a bus goes to are shown on the front of the bus. Some double-deckers have automatic doors and you pay the driver when you go in. On single-deckers you sometimes buy your ticket from a machine in the bus. Most London buses have a conductor who will come round and collect fares.

Sightseeing buses

There are many sightseeing, open top, buses in London and other cities.

London was the first city in the world to have an underground railway, called the 'tube'. The first line was built in 1890.